Apple

Expert predicts 10th anniversary iPhone will be wireless

The next generation of iPhone, which is expected to be released to mark the product’s tenth anniversary, will be completely wireless. This is the prediction made by Raimund Hahn, senior analyst for mobile phones at the Diplomatic Council global think tank and CEO of mobile phone wholesale group Rhino Inter Group.

The next generation of iPhone, which is expected to be released to mark the product’s tenth anniversary, will be completely wireless. This is the prediction made by Raimund Hahn, senior analyst for mobile phones at the Diplomatic Council global think tank and CEO of mobile phone wholesale group Rhino Inter Group.

The iPhone family

The iPhone family

“The iPhone 7 spells the end of headphone cables, while the iPhone 10 does away with charging cables,” said the expert, who claims to have direct access to the Asian supplier industry.

According to information Hahn received from the supplier community, a charging puck similar to the device available for the Apple Watch will be used for the inductive charging of the “iPhone 10”. However, the Diplomatic Council’s mobile phone expert speculates that so-called “room charging” or long-range charging technology, which enables a phone to be charged if it is in the same room as a charging station, will not be ready for release within the next year.

Hahn believes that in the future this up-and-coming near field magnetic resonance (NFMR) technology, which allows devices to be charged over distances of several meters, will result in us “never noticeably having to charge our mobile devices again because they will, to all intents and purposes, be automatically charged in the office, at home, in restaurants, et cetera and will be supplied with new energy from the air without us even being aware of it.”

“The MacBook and AirPods mark the start of Apple turning its vision of creating a wireless world in which all devices are only connected via radio waves into a reality,” explained Rhino’s CEO. “The process of supplying devices with power is the greatest challenge standing in the way of this. However, Apple already has a patent in NFMR and will definitely make use of this technology in the next few years.”

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